Georgetown Transfer Application Essay

 

Significance of Most-Involved Extracurricular Activity

 

Briefly (approximately one-half page) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

 

If you’ve been following CollegeVine’s blog regularly, you’ll quickly recognize this prompt as the “What is your most important extracurricular activity?” essay. Accordingly, there are two ways to approach the content of this portion.

 

The first strategy is to write about your most important extracurricular activity, regardless of how “common” it is perceived to be. You will want to emphasize the details of your participation as well as exactly how the activity has changed you. Discussing the impact of the activity on your life will be absolutely crucial, since it is the main way for your essay to be distinguished from other applicants’ (for example, “swimming” on its own wouldn’t be very unique, but how you turned your school’s team from a 3-man squad into a 80-person co-ed program is very impressive). Details here are key.

 

The second way to approach the prompt is to write about a unique extracurricular activity that needs more explaining — one that would be hard to fully understand without further elaboration. For example, while every admissions officer probably knows what “Model UN” is, not everyone who reads your application will know what your self-started charity Is — especially if on the extracurricular section, you refer to it by an ambiguous title, “Happy River Toys.”

 

Clearly, with so few characters available in the EC section, it’ll be difficult to fully encapsulate what “Happy River Toys” is, so using this essay space to elaborate will be particularly helpful for you.

 

Essay Which Best Describes You

 

All Applicants: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. 

 

This essay prompt is similar to various other school’s supplements (like Harvard’s) in that it is completely open-ended. The best strategy here (for sake of time and effort) might be to reuse your Common App essay. Visit our Common App post for more ideas.










Prompts Focusing on Specific Schools

The remaining essay prompts are separate for each particular school within Georgetown — students only need to write essays for the school they apply to. The first three essays have similar prompts so we will address them together.

 

Applicants to the McDonough School of Business: Discuss the factors that have influenced your interest in studying business.

Applicants to the School of Nursing and Health Studies: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Health Care Management & Policy, Human Science, International Health, or Nursing).

Applicants to Georgetown College: Please relate your interest in studying at Georgetown University to your goals. How do these thoughts relate to your chosen course of study? (If you are applying to major in the FLL or in a Science, please specifically address those interests.)

 

Ultimately, these prompts are asking the same thing. Essentially, you are tasked with writing “Why X Major?/Why Georgetown’s X Program?” essays. Thus, be sure to mention why you are planning on studying what you indicated — was it a past experience when you were little? Maybe you participated in an internship during your junior year summer? Or maybe your favorite class in high school was related to that subject?

 

Then, you’ll want to write about why Georgetown’s program is particularly suited to you — maybe it’s because of Professor X’s research? Or maybe it’s the small size of Y program, allowing you to get as much individual research attention as possible? Regardless, the key is to strike the fine balance of including details about your past experiences, current interests, and future goals.

 

Applicants to the Walsh School of Foreign Service: Briefly discuss a current global issue, indicating why you consider it important and what you suggest should be done to deal with it.

 

While the first three school-specific prompts were quite similar, the essay for the Walsh School of Foreign Service is slightly different. Here, you will want to adopt an academic approach to your essay.

 

Whichever global issue you choose, you should make sure to choose one that matters to you and is somewhat unique, in the sense that not everyone could write about it. Feel free to do research on your issue to corroborate your arguments. The point of this essay for the adcoms is so that they can evaluate your ability to think critically in a global context, as well as examine exactly to what degree you are interested in international affairs.

 

Hopefully with these tips, you will feel more confident about Georgetown’s individual application. If you would like more individualized help, CollegeVine’s highly trained essay consultants from the nation’s top schools can help ensure your Georgetown application is the strongest it can be. Best of luck in getting to Washington D.C.!

 









Transfer essays are different because transfers are different! As we used to say at Georgetown, every transfer has a story to tell…and the essay is their opportunity to do it!

The most frequent essay question for transfer applicants is “Why do you want to transfer to X School?” This is a two-sided question. It’s asking not only why you want to go to X school, but also why the school you currently attend isn’t a good fit. There are two key points you always want to keep in mind when answering this question:

  1. NEVER, EVER slam the institution you are leaving. Even if you hate it with a passion and can’t understand why anyone would like it there, don’t be negative. That will be the kiss of death for your application. Be honest when you can, but be kind to the institution you are leaving. It is a good fit for some, just not you.
  2. Make a solid and specific point as to why X school will be a better fit. If you think Boston University was “too big” and “too impersonal” but are applying to transfer to another school equally as large, you can’t use those as reasons. The admissions officer ultimately wants to know why their school is a better fit and what you’re going to bring to the table.

In general, transfers are less predictable in their applications. They often have had a serious incident happen in their life and/or a scattered academic record. The essay is, therefore, an excellent vehicle for explaining anything that might raise red flags. If you have anything that will stand out as odd in your application—address it head on! Don’t let your application reader guess why you flunked four classes or why your high school transcript is a disaster even though you have fabulous SAT scores. Be honest, be genuine, and tell your story. Don’t whine and don’t skirt around answers. Take ownership, but also tell your reader why she should take a chance on you. Admissions officers love the comeback kid. If that’s you, tell your reader!

Generally speaking, at Georgetown we wanted two of the three following items to be decent in a transfer application: high school transcript, SAT/ACT scores, or your college transcript. If you did fabulously in high school and on your SATs, we might be able to attribute lower college grades because you hated the place (hence, your transfer application). Alternatively, we could understand higher SATs and decent college grades with lower high school grades, as you might be truly bright but were a slacker in high school. Two factors on the low end, however, is not ideal because it insinuates that you may not be well qualified and may end up having to transfer yet again, which is what an admission officer wants to avoid.

Finally, visit, visit, visit! The best way to be able to answer “Why do you want to transfer to X school?” is to have visited and be able to give a very specific answer. The application reader wants to know that lots of thought and consideration has gone into your transfer process and that you’ve really clarified what you need out of an institution.

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