1984 Analysis Essays

1984 George Orwell Analytical Essay

Robert Sanchez

992542

P.5

Finesse of Emotions

What makes us human? What makes us human is our curiosity and constant evolution. What makes us human is the ability to create social categories and to form opinions. Abstract emotions including love, thought and creativity are what make us human. In 1984, George Orwell uses his dystopia to show that if we were to abolish these abstract emotions we would cease to be human and become the simple primates we once were; surviving for the sake of survival.

Orwell uses Winston and Julia's relationship to show the power of the human emotion of love. Winston is a pessimistic man that has nothing to live for except for life itself, until he meets a love interest; Julia. Orwell narrates "At the sight of the words�I love you�the desire to stay alive had welled up in him, and the taking of minor risks suddenly seemed stupid" (91). Winston is completely changed by the simple words "I love you". For a brief second he feels "the desire to stay alive" because he feels love. His whole purpose of survival is changed. Without this incident he would have kept struggling to survive for nothing but survival. In another instance, after Winston is captured and going though mental reconstruction he goes into room 101. Winston screams frantically, "Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don't care what you do to her. Tear her face off, strip her to the bones" (33). Winston is at a physiological point break due to the intense torture to where he will sacrifice his love for survival. Winston says not only to "do it to Julia!", but to "strip he to the bones" so he does not have to go through the intense torture. He exchanges his love and his humanity in order to survive, and therefore ceases being human.

Orwell shows how the limiting of creativity takes away from our humanity. In the golden country Winston is lying down enjoying the ambience. Orwell illustrates, "But by degrees the flood of music drove all speculations out of his mind…he stopped thinking and merely felt" (103). Winston is not accustomed to creativity, such as music. Here he is lying down taking in the warmth of the sun and enjoying music. Humans naturally enjoy the arts, like music; it's what makes us human. That simple act of letting the...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

1984 By George Orwell Essay

1955 words - 8 pages Things to know: 1984 was a book written about life under a totalitarian regime from an average citizen’s point of view. This book envisions the theme of an all knowing government with strong control over its citizens. This book tells the story of Winston Smith, a worker of the Ministry of Truth, who is in charge of editing the truth to fit the government’s policies and claims. It shows the future of a government bleeding with brute force and...

1984, by George Orwell. Essay

1829 words - 7 pages George Orwell's dystopian (a fictional place where people lead dehumanized and fearful lives) vision of the year 1984, as depicted in what many consider to be his greatest novel, has entered the collective consciousness of the English-speaking world more completely than perhaps any other political text, whether fiction or nonfiction. No matter how far our contemporary world may seem from 1984's Oceania, any suggestion of government...

"1984" by George Orwell Analysis

2429 words - 10 pages "1984" by George Orwell AnalysisWhen two claims contradict one another, it is futile and useless in attempting to analogize between the two. George Orwell, the author of the novel 1984, defines doublethink as "the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them." It is the idea of genuinely accepting two conflicting ideas, which eliminates an individual's capacity of being able to...

Symbolism in 1984 by George Orwell

863 words - 3 pages Symbolism in 1984 by George Orwell Symbols are everywhere. Whether it’s the cross of Christianity, or the swastika of the Third Reich, symbols can convey messages of love, or hate, without ever having to say a word. While George Orwell in his masterpiece 1984 does, of course, use words to convey his themes, he also uses symbols. In the novel 1984, symbols are used as a way for Orwell to reinforce his three major themes. One such...

Historical context of 1984-george orwell

2247 words - 9 pages George Orwell’s 1984 is one of the most important pieces of political fiction; it is a timeless political satire that demands to be read to be truly appreciated. Published in 1948, and set 36 years into the future, 1984 eerily depicts where the world is going, where the truth is shunted and lies are promoted by all mainstream media. Perhaps one of the most powerful science fiction novels of the twentieth century, this apocalyptic satire...

Society’s Influence on 1984 and George Orwell

1422 words - 6 pages Society’s Influence on 1984 and George Orwell "To say 'I accept' in an age like our own is to say that you accept concentration-camps, rubber truncheons, Hitler, Stalin, bombs, aeroplanes, tinned food, machine guns, putsches, purges, slogans, Bedaux belts, gas-masks, submarines, spies, provocateurs, press-censorship, secret prisons, aspirins, Hollywood films and political murder" (Bookshelf I). Politics, society, economy, and war...

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

2462 words - 10 pages Since the beginning of time man has tried to build vast empires to control the globe. Manifest Destiny has been sown into our human nature creating in us the desire to conquer. In the United States, we are accustomed to a safe democratic government where everyone has a voice and freedoms, but what if it all changed? What would it even look like for America to be stripped of all our freedoms, rights, and liberties? We think this is crazy and could...

Sybolism in "1984" by George Orwell

1062 words - 4 pages In 1984, Orwell makes excellent use of symbolism to further enhance the novel's theme and to reveal character. He wrote 1984 as a political message to warn future generations about the dangers of totalitarian societies. He relays this message through various themes and characters, in turn utilizes powerful symbols to give them further significance. His symbolism is very vast but it can be classified into three categories: characters, places and...

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell

1567 words - 6 pages Throughout history there has always been the people who attempt to take power and use that power to control others.  History shows, that certain government’s abuse their power and use it in various ways against their own people.  Both Stalin’s Party and the Party members from nineteen eight four by George Orwell, use their power against the people the govern over.  The novel is similar to Stalin’s Russia because of various factors.  The way they...

Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell (1984)

1090 words - 4 pages Nineteen Eighty Four by George OrwellIn the novel Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell, Orwell has presented us with his view of the future. I believe that Orwell was indeed on the right track concerning political government issues, even if all his predictions for 1984 did not become a complete realisation. I also believe that when George Orwell was writing this novel he did have a concern for the people in the future about the...

An Analysis of George Orwell and 1984

2578 words - 10 pages Through much of his life, Eric Arthur Blair (pen name George Orwell) sought to vilify the mental and emotional oppression he faced early on and breathe life into the specific ramifications entailed within Socialism as a result of the era in which he grew up in. The culminating result of these forces is evident in his last piece of work, 1984, where the very fabric of Socialism had become distorted in favor of a completely dystopian society in...

         “No one is free, even the birds are chained to the sky.” Bob Dylan said this probably not knowing its profound connection with George Orwell’s novel “1984”, but the as well could be in “1984”. Orwell depicts a totalitarian dystopian world where there is no freedom and citizens are being brainwashed constantly. Without any sense of individual fairness, people work for the party just like the gear wheels in a machine. In order to achieve this, the politicians in “1984” suppress people’s thinking and eliminate their freedom by creating fear through propaganda, strict laws and incessant surveillances.

In “1984”, lies, myths and false information controls the thinking of the citizens. The Party uses propaganda as the deadliest weapon of control. Propaganda increases the citizens’ morale and makes them think that what the party tells them to do is always right. There are mainly two types of propaganda, one changes truth, so-called doublethink, and another creates fear. “Doublespeak” can be seen frequently in the world of 1984. The party’s big slogan “WAR IS PEACE. FREEDOM IS SLAVERY. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.” (George Orwell, 4) is an good example. The idea of the slogan is to convince the citizens that what they want, is what they already have. Only war can make peace and harmony, so peace is no longer peace, it becomes war; anyone who is slaved and wants freedom, he already has freedom; you can only strengthen yourself by not knowing things and being ignorant. The slogan changes truth and make the citizens believe that anything they want other than what their government wants can only make them unhappy, therefore, no one will consider rebellion because they believe the Party’s way of governing is the best and only way. “BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU” (George Orwell, 3) is another core slogan. It is nearly everywhere in the country and usually presented beneath the picture of Big Brother on a poster. It creates fear of obliterated privacy among citizens by alerting them that they are watched all the time. At the same time, the slogan also emphasizes Big Brother’s power to tells the citizens that they are indeed safe and protected. The party uses this to make them believe that within the party nothing can go wrong, and without Big Brother they will not have such lives. Everyone thinks he is safe in Oceania because of the Big Brother, but they are in fact in danger, all the time.

         The laws is another powerful tool for politicians in “1984” to limit citizens freedom. No parties, no dates, no love, no citizens walk on street after curfew, laws are everywhere in Oceania. Although these are strictly implemented, they cannot be called laws theoretically because they are not written in a system. There is no written laws in 1984, there is no such thing as constitution or court, but that is exactly how fear is created, as citizens are always living in uncertainty. For example, “And yet it was a fact that if Syme grasped, even for three seconds, the nature of his, Winston’s, secret opinions, he would betray him instantly to the Thought Police” (George Orwell, 30). There is no law that defines thoughtcrime However, Winston could be arrested any time for committing thoughtcrime by even a tiny facial twitch suggesting struggle, and his nervous system literally becomes his biggest enemy. Since there is no written law, the Party can change and adjust the strictness of laws freely as it wants, citizens never know if they have committed any crime, therefore no one is brave enough to defy the Party by any level, so fear is created. In addition, “Newspeak” is another law that is enforced to solidify the Party’s control. Humans use language to express their ideas, by eliminating words and replacing emotional words such as “excellent”, “wonderful” and “fantastic” by a single word “good” and its comparative degrees “plusgood” and “plusplusgood”. Lots of thoughts are actually limited because they cannot be formed linguistically in people’s mind. Citizens then cannot have their own critical thinking, and only do what they are told to do, they work just as computers, which surprisingly only have two words.*

         Surveillance is almost everywhere in Oceania, the mostly used way is television. There is a two-way screen, so-called television in every apartment and on street but they only serve the purpose of monitoring and propaganda, the Party gets simultaneous image of what its people are doing. Even facial expression can be detected. Only senior members of the Inner Party have the power to turn them off for a short period. Children are also used to keep track of their parents, “The children, on the other hand, were systematically turned against their parents and taught to spy on them and report their deviations” (76). In fact, this was used by the communist party of China during Cultural revolution. With extremely mighty surveillance, citizens cannot express their ideas towards the negative side of the Party at all, and even thoughts are controlled because the Party can “reeducate” people for an incorrect facial expression

         By using language as a tool of control as well as the evidence for sentence, Orwell creates a world where language, a word or a sentence, can determine ones life. Through language plays the key role in the Party’s propaganda, strict laws and surveillance, total physical control as well as phycological manipulation is achieved. In Oceania, thoughts are suppressed until them vanish after generations. In this world, nothing is free, even a bird.

*0 and 1, Binary numeral system

Bibliography: Orwell, George. 1984. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1984. Print.

Like this:

LikeLoading...

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by paulechoisland. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *