Correctly Referenced Bibliography Format

A review article is an attempt by one or more scientists to sum up and analyze the current state of the research on a particular topic. Since a review article sums up results published in primary research articles it is a secondary source. Ideally, the author(s) searches for everything relevant to the topic, and then sorts it all out into a coherent view of the “state of the art” as it now stands. Review articles give you information on the background and context of a subject as well as the main people working in a field, recent major advances and discoveries, significant gaps in the research, current debates and ideas of where research might go next.

Review articles are virtual gold mines if you want to find out what the key articles are for a given topic. If you read and thoroughly digest a good review article, you should be able to “talk the talk” about a given topic. Unlike research articles, review articles are good places to get a basic idea about a topic.

There are different types of review articles:

Traditional or narrative literature review - “Critiques and summarizes a body of literature and draws conclusions about the topic in question”.

Cronin, P., Ryan, F. & Coughlan, M. 2008. Undertaking a literature review: a step-by-step approach. Br. J. Nurs. 17: 38-43.

 

Systematic review - “uses a more rigorous and well-defined approach to reviewing the literature in a specific subject area”.

Cronin, P., Ryan, F. & Coughlan, M. 2008. Undertaking a literature review: a step-by-step approach. Br. J. Nurs. 17: 38-43.

 

Meta-analysis - "Meta-analysis is a statistical technique for combining the results of different studies to see if the overall effect is significant". McDonald, J.H. 2014. Handbook of Biological Statistics (3 ed.). Sparky House Publishing, Baltimore.

APA Style® calls for a list of references instead of a bibliography.

The requirements of a reference list are that all references cited in the text of a paper must be listed alphabetically by first author's last name in the list of references and that all references listed must be cited within the text.

A bibliography, however, typically includes resources in addition to those cited in the text and may include annotated descriptions of the items listed.

In general, the list of references is double-spaced and listed alphabetically by first author's last name. For each reference, the first line is typed flush with the left margin, and any additional lines are indented as a group a few spaces to the right of the left margin (this is called a hanging indent).

For example:
APA Publications and Communications Board Working Group on Journal Article Reporting Standards.
      (2009). Reporting standards for research in psychology: Why do we need them? What might
       they be? American Psychologist, 63, 839–851. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.63.9.839

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